ASK SGT. MIKE

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Sgt. Mike's e-mail address is sgt.mike@comcast.net and if you write him there with your questions about life; love; death; the Marine Corps; how to clean a spot on the kitchen floor; what brand of boot polish to use; why the price of gasoline keeps going up; how to vote in the next presidential election; how to tell when a water melon is ripe, why blackberries are red when they are green (or is that green when they are red?); when does a fetus become a human being; what is the muzzle velocity of an M-16; or even something hard like what is the square root of 27,445,212.178 he will post your question and his answer below.  Be sure to check back often to see if your question has been answered. 

Please put in your subject line:  "Ask Sgt. Mike"  so he doesn't try to log your boot camp platoon in again.

No question is too hard.  No answer is too simple.  ASK SGT. MIKE!

Q: Where can I get a copy of my recruit training series book or platoon photo?

A: Platoon photos are available at Parris Island back to 1939. Photos from between 1939 and 1950 are limited, however. Individual photos of Marines are also available but back for four years. Recruit training series books are not available. To find out how to get photos, call Recruit Photo at (843) 228-3302, extension 7355 or 7356. 

Q: How do I find out information about my old recruit training platoon?

A: Records of past platoons are only kept for approximately four years before they are discarded. However there are several methods of tracking down information about your past platoon.

First you could get a platoon photo. See previous question for information.

In addition, Leatherneck magazine runs a monthly feature called "Mail Call," which is one way to try and contact former Marines. It is a free service and is printed on a space available basis. Send items for this service to:

Mail Call Editor
P.O. Box 1775
Quantico, VA 22134
1-800-336-0291

Q: Mike, can you tell me how I can find out what platoon my brother was in so I can get his platoon photo? Also do you know how I can get his records from Boot Camp? I have a copy of the time he spent in Vietnam but it doesn't mention the time he was in Parris Island, or when he went to Cuba. Do you know how many Platoons there were at Parris Island  in the beginning of 1966?  Billy was KIA on February 6th, 1968. Would you view my web page I created for him, and sign my Guest Book. I hope you can find his name someday soon....I like what you have typed about Our Lord And Savior Jesus. Judy in Mulberry Fl.

A. See above.  If any of our readers can help, the web site Judy mentioned is http://community-2.webtv.net/MsEwok/PFCWILLIAMLYOUNGJR/ 

Q. MY NAME IS BOBBY HUERTA I JUST TURNED 13 DEC,22 . WHEN I AM 18 I AM GOING TO JOIN THE MARINES ,THEN WHEN I GET OUT OF THE MARINES I AM GOING TO BECOME A FBI OR A CIA  AGENT. THE REASON I AM WRITING TO YOU IS BEFORE I GO INTO THE MARINES I WANT TO GET SOME BASIC TRAINING SO I WAS WONDERING IF  YOU KNOW ANY CAMPS IN THE SUMMER THAT I COULD GO TO  GET THE BASIC TRAINING I NEED.   THANK YOU

A.  My suggestion is that you go out for the football team or track and field and begin to build up your strength and endurance.  If you are still interested in pursuing the Marine Corps training in five years, please be good at it.  And contact me before you graduate.  I only live about 75 miles away from PI and perhaps I could attend your graduation.

Q. Your web site is great. Thank you! I am desperately trying to locate a platoon book from May 1980 - Platoon 3014 - Parris Island. I hit ebay every day. Have checked in at Leatherneck.com and have contacted the Historical society as you have suggested. Any more ideas. You are obviously resourceful, so I thought I would ask. Thanks again! Asmaida@aol.com  

A. That about covers it for me.  I wish I had a copy of every Platoon book ever made and could make them available to Marines who are desperately wanting to get their hands back on their own Platoon book.

 

Q. I am looking to find a way to replace my platoon book.  I graduated March 5, 1973 Platoon 1033 Parris Island.  Thanks for any help you can give.  Semper Fi  Jarrell Mills A Jarrell.L.Mills@mvk02.usace.army.mil 

A. Again with the lost Platoon book?  See my responses above.  Sorry guys, I don't have good news.  Hopefully somebody will look in their attic.

Q. Hi.  I'm trying to find the platoon number I graduated with on Parris Island.  I was injured with a head injury in Nam and lost almost all my memory.  I am trying to recall things now.  Do you know of a way I can get info on my platoon?  I was on the island early in 1967.

Thanks,

Bob Sayers

A. You might try writing to:

 

National Military Personnel Records Center
9700 Page Blvd.
Room 5007
St. Louis, MO 63132-5295

They are reported to be extremely helpful.

DoD Still Media Records Center Code SMRC Building 168, DoD Anacostia
2701 South Capital Street, SW
Washington, DC 20374-5080

National Archives Still Photo Branch
(202) 501-5445/5626 (research)
Best to come and look for yourself, only three searches may be requested telephonically.

National Archives Still Photo Branch
7th & Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20408

 

 

 

Q. Hi Sgt. Mike,Could you please tell me if the marines ever drafted. I am interested during the Vietnam war. Did they draft at that time? If so was it an option to join another branch of the service? Was the army reserves an option? There is money on this.
Thank you.
 

A.  I received a draft notice after my grade point average did not come up to the Dean's standards.  When my draft date to report arrived, my dad drove me 20 miles to the County Seat where I caught a bus along with 5 or 10 other draftees.  We were driven to Fort Jackson, an Army training post in Columbia, SC. 

 
While there, some time during the course of being probed , poked, pinched, plucked, peered into, and pondered, I was invited into a small room where a big First Seargent said, "Worden, we're placing you in the Marine Corps!  Any objections?"  I did know one could object in that situration so I replied, "No sir!" 
 
By 10:00 that night, I was back in my home town, 2 blocks from where I had awaken that morning.  The bus stopped there to await other recruits coming north from Jacksonville.  Then we were trnasported to Parris Island.  I was there two weeks before my mom knew where I was. 
 
So to answer your question, I believe all draftees reported to the Army, and then at some point, depending on the needs at that time, and through some magical method of intelligence, some were diverted to the Marine Corps.  I thank God and the Commandant every day that I was.
 
That was March 1966, and not many more were diverted after that.  That fact, however, bears no reflection on my performance as a Marine.  I think it was just time to begin searching for a few more GOOD men.
 
I hope that answers your question, and I hope you win the bet. 

Hey Mike,a couple of things.  I read about a question about draftees in the Corps. How the draft worked is that the Selective Service drafted men.  Each of the individual services put their requesitions in for the number of men they needed.  The Selective Service then sent that number to each of the services that requested men.  As far as I can tell no draftee was sent to the Navy or Air Force.  They had waiting lines to get in.  A friend of mine told me that in '67 when he was drafted, one out of three guys went to the Marines.  He was able to move his order in line to get sent to the Army. Semper Fi,

Tom Tilque, Cpl. USMC 1969-73

Thanks Tom for that update.

   

 

 

Q. Amy Wray-Just wondering:  ...

In the Marine Corps Hymn they are talking about the halls of montazuma. Where is this place located?

A. 

One of the most famous U.S. military hymns, the hymn of the U.S. Marine Corps a specialized fighting unit which is usually the first to enter contested territory actually begins with describing the 1805 Tripoli war. The marines sing:

"From the halls of Montezuma, to the shores of Tripoli,

we fight our country's battles

in the air, on land and sea."

The "halls of Montezuma" in those lines refer to the 1847 occupation of Mexico City and the Castle of Chapultepec, otherwise known as the "Halls of Montezuma."

Meanwhile, the "shores of Tripoli," refer to the war with Tripoli, in which the Marine Corps captured the Derne fortress and hoisted the American flag overseas for the first time in history.

Instead of preserving American peace in the Mediterranean, this policy brought on the war with Tripoli, which lasted from 1800 to 1805. It was principally fought over the U.S. refusal to pay money to the pasha of Tripoli to obtain immunity from raids.

This war with Tripoli carried great ideological importance for the Americans. In essence, they imagined themselves doing what the nations of Europe had been unable or unwilling to do beating the forces of Islamic despotism and piracy.

 

Q. I am looking for anyone from Plt. 2045 July - Sept. 1968, MCRD San Diego, Calif. I would enjoy hearing from my Senior D.I. Ssgt. D.J. Mills. One of our D.I."s, Ssgt. L.M. Holyfield passed away in approximately early 1990's. Semper Fi., Sgt. Rick Lewis Vietnam, Class of " 69 ".rickandmarylewis@msn.com

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